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The Power Of Mutual Allyship

Since the murder of George Floyd, conversations around antiracism and what it means to be an ally have reached an all-time high.
As is so often the case in our fast-paced and social media driven society, people are and were quick to catch on to terms and make them ‘trendy’. ‘Allyship’ has certainly been tweeted and shared more in the last year than ever before.
But what does ‘being an ally’ really mean? What does ‘being an ally’ have to do with doing the work of antiracism, unravelling our bias and elevating marginalised voices?

Consent And Stealthing In Bridgerton: Wait, Daphne, Wait!

here has been a lot of love and some hate regarding the show ‘Bridgerton.’ It was beyond refreshing to see black people in a period drama where their race was not the focus, where they aren’t delegated to the role of servant, instead playing heroes and queens integral to the storyline. The show’s popularity could also mean positive change in castings when it comes to diversity. Something, as a black actress and writer, I absolutely celebrate. On the other side, there have been accusations of colourism levelled at the show. In the main Bridgerton features black people with lighter skin tones in main roles – Men of a darker complexion are relegated to the stereotypical roles of strong man and in the case of the Duke’s Father, the black absentee dad. That is not to mention the sheer lack of black women with darker skin. I literally could not think of a single one. But there is one criticism levelled at the series that struck me and had me asking: Did I just watch a rape scene? And did I just see female stealthing and is that even a thing?

Why Sex Education Is Leaving Black Students Behind

Talking about consent is weird. I can say that confidently; I’ve been doing it for more or less the past eight years, working with a handful of organisations who deliver conversations about consent in universities, schools and workplaces. And talking about consent with teenagers? Awkward and weird…

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The Struggles Of Being A Female Doctor In Nigeria

In most medical schools in Nigeria, there is a common saying, that girls make the better students and boys the better doctors. As sexist as this statement seems, it is the reality for most.The cultural landscape of the country often limits women from reaching the peak of their careers. The average Nigerian woman, albeit educated, is expected to prepare for family and place the needs of the family ahead of hers. This extra pressure to be the main carer in the family, to cater to her husband and children impacts her opportunity to pursue her career and hone her skills. Although, some women manage to balance this cultural pressure with their educational and career goals it is an obstacle for many.

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